Homelessness: The Sad Truth

True stories from those who are in need.

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Homelessness: The Sad Truth

Kyla Rosas, Staff

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All around the world, there are tons of people without homes. They live in cars, tents, out on the streets, or jumping from house to house staying with friends, but they just don’t have a home. The safety and security of a home, maybe they had it once or they never did, but it’s something we all need. According to The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, in the United States, more than half a million people are homeless, either in cars, on the streets or in homeless shelters. 6.38% of those are children, 8.33% are veterans, and 47.6% are disabled and unable to work. According to Forbes, New York City has the highest homeless population out of all the cities in the U.S. and California is the state with the most homeless people. The main causes of homelessness are poverty, job loss, substance abuse, domestic violence, lack of affordable housing, mental illness, and lack of health care.

Here are a few stories about homeless people found on the Huffington Post. Renee Delisle was one of about 3,500 homeless people in Santa Cruz, CA when she found out she was pregnant. She was turned away from a shelter because there wasn’t enough room for her. Renee ended up living in an abandoned elevator shaft until her water broke. A homeless former Marine, Jerome Murdough, was found sleeping on a public housing stairwell in New York on a cold night. He was arrested and died one week later of hyperthermia in a jail cell heated to over 100 degrees. Paula Corb and her two daughters ended up homeless because they lost their home. They lived in their car for about four years, went to the bathroom at gas stations, did laundry at a church annex, and did their homework under street lamps.

Being homeless truly is tough. There are tons of people that need help. If possible, donate or help out at a local homeless shelter. I hear socks are the most requested in shelters. Give change or food to people out on the streets. Help people in need. All the little things count!

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